Vision in amblyopia

In recent years there have been a number of treatments proposed for amblyopia in adults. These treatments (reviewed in this paper) often involve balancing the inputs to the two eyes – down-weighting the input to the stronger eye to allow the weaker eye to contribute. The treatments improve visual function in the amblyopic eye, and some patients have even recovered stereo vision (e.g. see this TEDx video by ‘stereo’ Sue Barry). However we know very little about the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, or indeed what the nature of the neural deficits in amblyopia actually are.

Today a new paper came out online in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Vision Science. In it, we show that neural responses in amblyopia are reduced in the affected eye. We used a steady-state visual evoked potential technique to measure responses in each eye. The reductions are large enough that they could potentially be used to monitor improvements in visual function during treatment.

These data served as the pilot results for a grant proposal that was recently funded by the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders (and part-funded by the Wellcome Trust). The plan is to use both fMRI and EEG to understand the architecture of the amblyopic binocular visual system, and to monitor improvements in visual function during a course of therapy. A postdoc job is available for 18 months to work on this project, and I’d be very interested in hearing from qualified applicants before the deadline (27th February 2015).

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